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of the commerce and industry have visited capital this week. the group is headed by the chairman. they have meetings with vietnam's minister of industry and trade and the representative of the chairman of commerce. the goal is to expand their business in the country. following the recent japan protest he's growing anxious about china. employees with their own business were to remain inside their hotel. >> translator: i cannot easily dispel my risks about operating in china. it made me think we should start considering moving our business somewhere else. >> reporter: vietnam has been trying to end foreign problems. the timing couldn't be better for vietnam. >> translator: the people have positive feelings about japan. they are facing problems but we don't have to worry. in that sense there's no mental stress. >> reporter: east asian countries look impressive. >>> spanish leaders are poised to make stringent cuts in their latest budget plans. they too are tighten their belts. ramin, you showed us those pictures from greece. now this. >> reporter: the focus is going to be on spain. many are qu
of the legislation. the bill passed out of our subcommittee and the full energy and commerce committee on voice votes with strong, strong bipartisan support. i believe, mr. speaker, it has a high likelihood of being accepted to the senate and to the president. we will certainly give them that opportunity. i urge my colleagues to support this bill so we can finally see this significant improvement signed into law. i want to thank mr. murphy and all of the others who worked to expedite this legislation and get it to the floor today, and i'm going to ask my colleagues to join with us in passing this bill. with that said, mr. speaker, i will reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from pennsylvania. mr. murphy: mr. speaker, i have no more speakers on this bill, and i'm prepared to close if the gentleman from north carolina is prepared to close as well. mr. butterfield: i have no more speakers and i am too prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from north carolina is
a memorandum to the u.s. chamber of commerce and said american industry, the free enterprise system is under assault from the labor union movement. from ralph nader and the consumer movement. from a salt from regulatory agencies from the environmental protection agency. a lot of agencies, agencies that were set up by richard nixon. the republican president that regarded himself as a friend of industry and loved to hobnob with the captains of industry and poll said they have to go fight and industry -- get organized. they have to play hard ball aggressively and that is what happened. the chamber of commerce circulated the polls memorandum as it is known to business leaders all over the country. the business roundtable, the most powerful force for major corporations in america was formed. the national association of manufacturers moved its headquarters to washington. the national federation of independent businesses clip from 3000 members in 1971 yo 600,000 by 1980. business developed all this muscle. business had 18,000 registered lobbyists and pr people. 50,000 people working for their trade
a foothold in the country. the chairman of atpan chamber of commerce and industry made the request at a meeting with vietnamese president. seeking the cooperation of the vietnamese government in improving the country's business environment. he says, japanese firms with high technologies can contribute to the economy. the president expressed his intention to provide maximum support stressing that vietnam is politically stable. officials at atpan chthe japan of commerce say firms in china may switch to vietnam. responding to recent anti-japan demonstrations in china. >>> company executives will launch the new models in japan by march 2013. sharp has commercialized the world's first super high definition lcd panels. they consume 20% of the power compared to previous models. the firm may supply the panels to taiwan's precision industry. sharp is in talks with the taiwanese electronics firm about capital tie-up. sharp aims to turn to the black by showing a net profit in the business year through march 2014. the firm's main creditors, are to offer loans up to a combined total of $2.5 bil
in the the country before the protests. a spokesperson at china's commerce ministry said investments were down 1.4% from a year earlier. the decline was due to the global impact stemming from the european debt crisis. the european union invested about 4% less from january to august of the previous year. investments from the united states fell almost 3%. meanwhile, japan's direct investments into the first eight months of the the year rose over 16% from the year before. but that was before the anti-japan demonstrations this month, which saw rioters attacking japanese supermarkets and dpe stroiing factories. it's uncertain whether investments from japan will continue to rise. many japanese firms are reassessing the risks of doing business in the cntry following the protts. > now let's gt a check of the markets. u.s. and european markets ended higher after further monetary easing was announced. how are things kicking off this thursday morning? >> good morning. u.s. and european investors were cheered by the bond buying measures and positive housing data in the u.s. helped market sentiment there. le
. challenges like illicit drug trafficking, trans-national crime and terrorism, in hansen commerce between nations, and dealing with climate change. it requires courage and leadership to take the first step toward mutual understanding. i have been particularly impressed recently with the president of colombia as he reaches out to two of his neighbors to restore diplomatic relations. they do not always agree on everything, but they can now work together on issues of security in and across their borders. i am particularly pleased that he has begun talks with the farc. this morning, i was on the radio with the president, talking about this problem, which i hope he will resolve with the support of other leaders in his country. likewise, to improve the relationship between my country and cuba, that requires courage on both sides. i am distressed that the united states -- that they continue the economic embargo against cuba and displayed no interest in furthering or improving diplomatic relations. all of us have continued to press the cuban government to respect human rights and political openne
, the chamber of commerce, the labor council, surrounding businesses, and many surrounding neighborhoods and neighborhood groups. why? because it's a great project. and let's be honest. nothing about the merits of this project has changed since then. eight washington will revitalize a horribly underutilized stretch of the waterfront currently cut off from the rest of the city. the only thing that's changed is a group of people have forced this onto the ballot. this is disturbing to have a referendum on a a planning and zoning matter. we know how difficult it is to have a residential project from this city and to let a group of people stop a project is very serious, and this will have an effect not only on market rate... >> president chiu: thank you. next speaker. and again let me ask if there are members of the public that wish to speak, please line up. >> i am not one of the well-healed people. i got signatures on the ballot, and i didn't pay for them, no one paid me for them. i went out and i got them. you all are being asked to uphold referendum causes. the referendum causes have been
to the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce here in l.a. both the president and the romney campaign have plans to shift their focus to the economy this week. romney's planned speech the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce will talk about balancing the budget by eliminating nonessential federal programs and to cut down on federal employment through consolidation. he's promising to fix the imgreat lakes -- the immigration system with an emphasis on border control. >> trade has to work for america. that means crack down on cheaters like china and open up new markets. next, we have to balance the budget. cut the deficit. got to stop spending more money than we take in. >> speaking of china, the white house is asking the world trade organization today to stop china from putting unfair taxes on u.s.-made vehicles and in a second separate request stop china from financially undermining u.s. auto part exports. today is the one-year anniversary of the occupy wall street movement. protestors have already started to gather in the
the commerce department and what it showed was that the median price of a newly constructed home is at $257,000. that's a jump up 11% from july to august. now, a few reasons for these higher prices. less of a supply of homes on the market and that means more people are going after fewer properties. plus, mortgage rates are at record lows. that's a real good incentive to get people out there to buy. also, an increasing number of buyers. they just haven't been able to find previously owned homes that they like, they are opting to go brand-new and those are traditionally more expensive. victor? >> good news for the housing market. what impact did this have on the overall economic outlook? >> no doubt about it. housing is really a critical component and manufacturing is what pulled us out of the recession and economists, they want to see them pass the baton. that's really important for consumer spending because when people feel like their home is worth more, they feel wealthier and they tend to spend more and that's something our economy needs. a direct correlation with the job's market. people
to the commerce clause, individual mandate. we began the litigation and motions were filed by the government. and in oklahoma, when the case was taken up by the supreme court. as of the decision in june, i filed a motion to lift the stay in oklahoma, the eastern district, asking judge white to consider an amendment. as you know, the original challenge was about constitutionality of the cadets. this is about implementation. this addresses the concerns about the irs a world that was adopted may 18 specifically, and the affordable care act's the implementation, if you will, of the employer mandate, the penalty under the law dealing with large employers. it is about that role an inconsistency with the language, the statute, and seeking to hold the pro-government accountable as it relates to implementing that particular portion of the law. host: what about that part of the law? is it unconstitutional or illegal? guest: the specifics include cross that under the aca, a state does not adopt a state health care exchange, then the subsidies, the tax credit, did not issue to the state and consequently
and the internet became a platform for e commerce and services and 1985. after that we had a lot easier search for a permission and enabling more and more information communication technology innovation. in the coming years our governments embraced that i see tea dividend for the hope of the economic growth and productivity that it enabled and for the innovation agenda that it enabled. and we started to put more and more of our business services on to the backbone of the internet. today we have e-banking and e-commerce already in the internet. we are moving toward a future of having our energy distribution of a smart protected to the internet. we are moving to a generation of next generation aviation and air traffic control that is controlled by the internet and over the internet. and so we have moved so much of our essential services on to the internet than one has to ask, is that what it was designed for? is it's a cure for what we need a fork in the future? this brings about three tensions. i am going to try to stick to three. three tensions that we are seeing in the policy world and then t
was not like the department of commerce with people under him, but it was a small staff, and that was a good thing. he accumulated power through the friendships in congress with democrats and with republicans and i think it's special pert innocent now with the recent passage of the three bills last night, the trade bills with colombia, panama, and south korea. everyone's making such a big deal about, you know, how they got them through quickly and how bipartisan they were, and it's true, but this bill was also devicive, and it was not just three countries bob was negotiating with, but 102. this was one of the really large rounds of trade, and so i wanted to read a little bit about how bob negotiated through congress. at the part in the -- the bill end up passing 305 #-7 # # in the house and 90-4 in the senate, and after the house vote came in, bob said to stu, a domestic policy adviser. stu, who are the seven sons of bitches who voted against my bill? [laughter] he got the victory. there was a controversial bill, a devicive bill, and he still got the 395-7 vote and 90-4 vote. at this point,
, saying no to the civil rights bill. it doesn't work there for interstate commerce. i don't know which way roberts would go on a similar question. those issues are close right now. >> it's complicated. one of the cases that could be considered is the voting rights act. that could be overturned. obviously affirmative action is going to be on the docket. that's a very complicated issue but it works both ways. there's a high chance this court will hear an appeal to doma. it could be the first court that establishes some progress sift with respect to gay rights. it could make a historic court even though the politics would suggest otherwise. it works both ways and it will be curious to see not only which cases they pick up in what manner and how the arguments play out because doma could come up and so could prop 8 which is a different section of the gay rights debate. i'm curious to see how it plays out. i'm assuming jeff will be on top of it. >> jeff is on top of it right now. a lot of people who watch this show are pro choice, some not, but many are. how would roe v. wade be taken down. what
, information, in what direction and it continues. it is this same debate. you can talk about the commerce clause and equal protection of due process. it is all the same debate and it is an appropriate debate and hit is one that i would wish would sort of try to reach the same high-level that we saw in philadelphia that we are going to see at other points in the ratification process. sort of defense and arguments. who sits at home and drafts arguments that you see letters? you don't have a staff do these things. these are people who were engaged and also -- these were not scholars. these were not people who appropriated to themselves licenses to interpret or talk about this. these were foreigners. some of them who had formal education and some did not but they cared about this country. i think that i go back to your point. you talk about the written and the unwritten constitution. the unwritten constitution is sort of trying to to bring current events and problems and development and that debate continues on each one of them and that is why you see different points. that is why arguments -
of egypt don't do this and certainly the people in the modernized sector, business and commerce, every day fluent in english and working with the west and cutting business deals and generate jobs and keep the economy of egypt moving or get it moving again, these people have nothing to do with this. this is a very, very small minority. and we shouldn't read anything about it as far as the government or people of egypt are concerned. but what we should do is be working with the egyptians. they've been a long-time u.s. ally to be able to put down the problem, additional intelligence assets they need and take from them information they may have gathered to help us and others in yemen and libya and some place else. >> the warships, thank you, general. >> thank you don. >> appreciate it. we'll be back with more breaking news happening overseas and here in the united states with the chicago teachers strike right after this break. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new completely re-imagined 2013 chevrolet malibu. sleek new styling... sophisticated dual cockpit design, and sport ulpted sea
is the hub of international media and commerce. in his blighted neighborhood he hates the south like east berlin hated west berlin. they haven of entrepreneurialism have always outperformed the statist neighbors south korea over north korea. hong kong and taiwan. this is a universal truth the south of fills the same role today with the prosperity exposed the impoverished lies and deceit. that is why liberals hate the south. [applause] because they believe the environment of hillbillies have defeated them. they can barely stand it. and it lies with though 17 virtue in the end even the liberal haccp have the place to live or work driving and nail in the dream because as he picked -- packs of this stuff soon you'll hear the words that will drive a dagger into his hopes. how the neighbor. [laughter] , everybody gets the trophy. [laughter] . . about high school graduations and the issue of valedictorians. the -- the torian initio? did they go on a crime sprain alcohol binge? and it turns out i used bunch of schools in america think that by having just one of the the the torian is mean spirited
downstream and the rivers were the essence of commerce. they were the avenues of transport. and, you know, jefferson himself sometimes wondered whether louisiana's fate was with the united states. so burr was simply, i don't know, if he was articulating or was simply letting people articulate what they thought their future might be because if you lived in new orleans in 1805, it took forever to get to washington, or new york, and you could well ask yourselves, how can those people in the east govern us? that was part of what he was up to. would he have waged war against the united states? i doubt it certainly. he only had 50 guys. and so, he didn't have a army he could wage a war with. he did hope that a war would break out between spain and the united states. so did andrew jackson. so did james wilkinson, by the way who really was the trader in this story. wilkinson for decades was on the payroll of the spanish government unbeknownst to his superiors in the u.s. army and the u.s. government. anyway, so burr's logic strikes us, perhaps, assuming that he did what he was alleged to have don
satellite corp. 2012] >> scrapping appear with the chamber of commerce as they complete their briefing here today. congress returns from their august break this afternoon. the house will gavel in at 2 eastern. members will debate setting federal spending for the next budget year as well as extending federal surveillance. in the house why here starting at 2:00 p.m. eastern. the senate will vote on a judicial nomination for iowa. later this week, debate on a veterans' jobs bill. the house is live here on c-span and the senate is on the c- span2. c-span3 will be live with a discussion of defense policy, the brookings institute hosting a conference on the differences between president obama and it romney. that's live at 1:00 eastern on our companion network, c-span3. at 3:30, c-span3 will go back to the king's institute for a discussion on national security and terrorism. there highlighting 12 major issues facing the next president. that starts at 3:30 eastern on c-span 3. >> vice-president joe biden continued his swing. ohio last weekend. he spoke yesterday at a rally in portsmouth. ♪ ♪ >>
people. when you go to kabul today, you see a city with electricity, with commerce, with cars, with movement, with women in school, and the average afghan doesn't want to go back to the taliban way of doing business where there is no music, there no interaction with each other, only on terms that they set for you. and so what you see on your television at night is a political struggle for the heart and soul of the middle east. this has been going on for a long time, and finally the lid blew. egypt was an authoritarian, corrupt dictatorship. tunisia, libya was ruled by qadhafi, syria by assad. and what you see is people who have seen another way of living are saying enough already. i'm not going to be part of that anymore. i'm going to try to change my life and my children's life. within that population, you also have people who are dead set on making sure that that nation and the islamic world goes backward, not forward, and we have to take sides. and if we don't take sides and we sit on the sidelines, we'll pay a price. i think it is better to help people fight the taliban th
chamber of commerce, the university of washington african studies program and at the of public affairs in seattle university's asian studies and global african studies program. as we do with all of our bands to reach a larger audience and the one here tonight, we are going to be tweeting this event. the hash tag will be moyo whack, so if you're on twitter, follow, join, ask questions, engage. we believe dialogue and discussion are critical to developing the world and i invite you to participate in the conversation. we will do an open q&a for tonight's events in a volunteers passing around a wireless microphone. we do also have no cars available if you prefer to write down your question and pass it to a volunteer to ask for you. moderating tonight's q&a will be dr. anand yang can access of international studies and history at university of washington. june 2002 and 2010, he was director of the henry and jackson school of international studies. prior to joining university of washington, he taught at the university of utah where he was chair of the history department and subsequently dire
chamber of commerce, the african studies program and the other school of public affairs at seattle university's asian studies and global african studies program. as we do about our offense in order to reach a larger audience than the one here tonight, we are going to be tweaking this event from seattle. the hash tag will be moyo whack. so if you are on twitter, join, ask questions coming days. we believe they are critical to developing a better understanding of the world and invite you to participate in the conversation. we will between open q&a for two nights event that we have volunteers who will pass around a wireless microphone. we do also have notecards available if you prefer to write down your question and pass it to a volunteer to ask for you. moderating tonight's q&a will be dr. anand yang, professor of international studies and history at the university of washington. between 2002 and 2010, he was the director of the header and jackson school of international studies. prior to joining university of washington, he taught at sweet briar college and the university of utah, w
interest in commerce, freedom of navigation and it's just good for the united states to get back in the pacific and we are going to be a part of it. >> let me ask you a couple of follow-up questions and then open up to the audience. you mentioned mega cities and work going on here about long range trends that shows that the urbanization trends that we have seen to date are going to accelerate, 60% of the world's population by 2030 and so it seems like the marines are particularly useful in urban warfare settings. what i'm seeing in these trends, future of the world is going to be in cities, for good, ill or other. how do you sort of -- paying attention on the long range trends and getting marines ready for urban warfare and paying attention to the training priorities i'm sure you are focused on. >> if you look at the population growth and we talked about the 15 to 20 mega cities, over 75% of the world's largest cities are within about 62 miles of the coastline. if you map that around the world, all around europe and asia to include our country and europe, you would see the bulk o
the chamber of commerce every -- literally has bought up every piece of time on the airwaves. we have an intern at the nations from toledo and went back least week and said you cannot see anything except negative attack ads. most of them against brown. >> we have a graph, you can see here where the political parties are absolutely dwarfed in their spending compared to the super pacs and the -- 501-c-4s. i wonder if this is an ultimate form of voter suppression. we talked about voter i.d. in ohio, early voting restrictions. if i can throw all of this at it is that the ultimate way of voter suppression? >> one of the reasons why the electoral system such a mess with supportivesy sense united and the voter suppression laws is because it is not in the interest of both political parties to support an electoral process, more transparent and includes everyone and that levels of the playing field important money. until we have that it is going to keep being a mess. it is kind of like -- actually donald rumsfeld had a phrase which is that if you have a problem and can't solve it you enlarge it
to commerce and trade and later, of course, would sponsor the federal highway system, at that time the largest public works project in american history. eisenhower was a military man, but he was not militaristic. >>> this is, that he did in not think war was a solution to anything. he was, as one aide recalled, slow to pick up the sword. ike's public persona, that grandfatherly man with a big smile and a love of golf was largely ike's personal invention. behind the scenes, he was strategically rigorous and a tough-minded commander in chief. the people who worked for him never doubted who was in charge. eisenhower was a citizen of the world more than any other president. yet he never forgot where he came from, that's why his presidential library is in abilene, kansas, close to where i live. ike was not a professional politician, yet he was one of the most successful politicians in our history, and supremely protective of his hero's image. ike did not hesitate to use subordinates like john foster dulles as lightning rods for controversial policies that were, in fact, ike's creation. eisenhower w
to london. that's why atlanta, georgia, is a hub of commerce. the american liberal isn't -- and his blighted neighborhood looks upon all of this. he hates the south like an east berliner hated west berlin. throughout the were with seen this time and time again. havens of entrepreneurialism and individual liberty have always outperformed the statist neighbors. whether it was west germany leaping over east germany, hong kong and taiwan putting china to shame, or singapore outshining impoverish malaysia. this has been universal truth of history. the south fulfills that same role today. that's why liberals hate the south. [applause] liberals hate the south because what they believe is an assignment of ignorance has defeated them in affluence and sophistication. they can barely stand it, but there is so. and it lies in a once in virtue i've yet to mention because much as bill of rights the south, in in even a little has to find a place to live and work and that's where southern hospitality drives the final minute into the dream. because if the liver packs up and leaves, he knows with dread and so
, or look at the economic report of the departments of commerce or finance in brazil and south america. it's astonishing the universe and the reach of it that we have available to us very easily these days, but it takes a more vigilant and aggressive role on the part of us who are the consumers of that news. >> host: arline e-mails in from pennsylvania. wanted to thank you for the piece you did during the olympics on the people of british, columbia, and assistance during 9/11. it was very moving and taught us all that we need to care for each other. >> guest: it was tender, newfoundland. i was in british columbia when i did. gander is a place for some people of a certain age will remember where used to stop on your way to europe for refilling. especially if you're flying from the west coast. it was billed as a long range bomber base for refilling during world war ii, and then was a trans-atlantic jets of come a kind of went into a different gear. it sits up there on the edge of the atlantic ocean. i've been in and out of there because i'm a fisherman and the like to fish in newfoundland. a
. there is a great interest on commerce, freedom of navigation, and it is just good for the united states to get back to the pacific. we will be a part of it. i am excited for that. >> let me ask you a couple of follow-up questions. you mentioned megacities and there is some work going on here at the a bennett council on long-range trends. shows the urbanization trends we have seen are going to its telerate. we're talking about 60% of the world's population in cities by 2030. 70% by two dozen 40. -- buy 2040. -- by 2040. the future of the world will be in the cities. for good or not. while still paying attention to some of the near-term training priorities your focus on. >> if you take a look of the population growth, and the talk about 15 to 28. the truth is over 75% of the world's largest cities are within about 100 kilometers, 62 miles from the coast line. the map that around world, all round europe. -- if you map that all run the world, all round asia, you would see the bulk of the population is centered along. that makes a naval forces, and i am prejudiced here, and ust marie de tocqueville, but
. lawrence a way to open up the center of the country to commerce and trade and later of course the federal highway system, that times the largest public works project in american history. eisenhower was a military man but he was not relativistic. bat as he did not think that war was often a solution to anything. he was what one would call slow to pick up the sword. ike's public persona to grandfather the man with a big smile was largely ike's personal invention. behind the scenes he was strategically vigorous and a tough-minded commander in chief. the people who worked work for him never doubted who was in charge. eisenhower was -- more than any other person. he never had forgotten where he came from and that is why his presidential library is in abilene kansas, close to where i live. ike was not a professional politician that he was one of the most successful politicians in our history and supremely protective of his image. ike did not hesitate to use support like secretary of state john foster dulles as lightning rods for controversial politics that were in fact his creation. eisenhower
, and once the cities get to be a certain density and there's enough commerce, enough population, then in the early part of the 19th century, they get going, and they really take off in 1830s. >> so that's when it's fair to say for the first time that journalism is a business? >> oh, yes. it's clear by then, yeah. >> now, we, as much as people make fun of us for this, think of ourselves as a professional school, and so i have to ask -- >> more power to you. >> when did the notion of journalist as a professional, whatever that means, come on the scene? >> right, right. well, that is still contested terrain in the sense that -- >> you and i both remember going into journalism, guys in the news room who had not gone to college who were upset that the college kids were going into journalism. >> that's right. [laughter] yes, and you still hear that today once in awhile, you know, if you find the right kind of a perp, you can get a ballroom stool argument going over the necessity of journalism's instruction, but, you know, ncht, that apprentice model that you and i came across when we
, ideology and commerce. walter is one of those people that moves easily from history to politics to miscommunication and there is a reason why. he's been the editor of "time" magazine, the chairman and cnn, the chairman of the broadcasting board of governors, the chairman of teach for america. somewhere along the way he began to turn his voracious appetite for a good story to making stories of the zone. steve jobs, his latest book is a deeply absorbing exploration of the might and personality of the founder and chief of apple incorporated. given the story to hear from steve jobs himself to write an authorized biography, someone else might have turned the book into a puff piece, heavy on accomplishment and light on flaw. but his book is anything but that. it is a full-scale portrait of a fascinating america. it's the story of a boy that started a vision in his garage with a friend from down the street turned into a worldwide phenomenon. the president of the "washington post" said yesterday walter isaacson's book is yet another perfectly designed product by steve jobs, for he knew
to be a responsible partner in the world of trade and commerce, they have to understand they cannot take away jobs on an unfair basis. >> investing in companies that uprooted from here and went to china. you cannot stand up to china when all you have done is send them our jobs. >> watch and engage with c-span as the campaign to toward the elections. foreign policy will be the debate of -- will be the focus of debate no. 3. audience members will get a chance to ask questions on tuesday the 16th. the final debate on foreign policy will take place the 22nd. watch the vice president debate october 11. >> maxine waters was cleared of ethics by listen charges today. her chief of staff, who is also her grandson, still faces an inquiry. they determined there was no evidence that representative waters pressured the treasury department to give a bailout to the united -- the minority on the bank. the committee findings concludes a two-year investigation and is one hour 40 minutes. >> first included allegations of the investigation and the 111th congress violated represent of waters due process rights. they u
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)